Labby's Pet Profile
DNA Test Results
Category positive carrier CLEAR

Ophthalmologic - Associated with the eyes and associated structures

1

-

27

Urinary system / Urologic - Associated with the kidneys, bladder, ureters and urethra

-

-

8

Immunologic - Associated with the organs and cells of the immune system

-

-

2

Metabolic - Associated with the enzymes and metabolic processes of cells

-

-

13

Musculoskeletal - Associated with muscles, bones and associated structures

-

-

8

Nervous system / Neurologic - Associated with the brain, spinal cord and nerves

1

-

31

Endocrine - Associated with hormone-producing organs

-

-

3

Cardiovascular - Associated with the heart and blood vessels

-

-

1

Haemolymphatic - Associated with the blood and lymph

-

-

11

Digestive system / Gastrointestinal - Associated with the organs and structures of the digestive system

-

-

1

Dermatologic - Associated with the skin

-

-

6

Reproductive - Associated with the reproductive tract

-

-

1

Respiratory - Associated with the lungs and respiratory system

-

-

1

Trait (Associated with Phenotype)

-

-

1

Labby's Health Profile

Confirmed medical conditions:

Current medications:

My Clinic:

Orivet vet clinic
Pet Owners Concerns
Diarrhea / Loose stools
Digging
Redness,Discharge from eyes
Labby's Health Risks

The list below was generated by our proprietary algorithm. It takes into account Labby's breed makeup, age, weight, sex and other lifestyle factors.

Please note. It does not mean Labby will ever actually contract any of these diseases. It only represents an increased RISK when comparing Labby's genetic information to published scientific information available.

Disease Estimated Prevalance Result

Cataract (Cloudiness of the Lens of the Eye)

Screening Suggestions
1. DNA test if available for the breed - screen breeding animals prior to entering into a breeding program – NB available currently for Australian shepherd, French bulldog, Boston terrier, Staffordshire bull terrier (juvenile form), miniature American shepherd 2. Eye examination by veterinary ophthalmologist; recommended as part of puppy eye exam, then annually (may be required for breeding certification).
Overview

Most cases of cataract in dogs are of an inherited form. This disease causes cloudiness in the lens of the eye. This cloudiness may be located in the centre of the lens, or towards the front or the back of the lens. Inherited cataract is almost always bilateral (that is, in both eyes). 

 

The disease can become apparent over a wide range of ages, ranging from when the puppy first opens its eyes to around 6-8 years of age. Cataracts that develop at or around birth are termed congenital cataract. Those that develop in dogs under 2 years of age are called juvenile cataract, while those developing in dogs between 2-6 years are termed adult onset cataract. Those that develop in  dogs older than 8 years are generally not of an inherited nature, and may sometimes be due to other disease (e.g. diabetes mellitus).

 

Cataract may also progress (get worse) at varying rates, resulting in initial blurred vision which may often progress to complete blindness.  Some cataracts may progress very rapidly.  It also may not progress much at all, and this is termed static cataract.  Congenital cataracts may be static in nature or they may progress.  They may be inherited, or may be secondary to other inherited defects (e.g. persistent pupillary membrane or persistent hyaloid artery) or secondary to in utero infections, toxicities or other foetal trauma.

 

Cataract is diagnosed by eye exam once it is present in the lens, and by ruling out other causes. There are DNA tests available for the inherited form of cataract in some breeds. Most cataracts can be treated surgically, and the earlier this is performed the better the prognosis is, and the less chance there is for complications. An intraocular replacement lens is often placed, which helps improve post-surgical vision. 

 

Breeding programs in breeds where cataract is a major concern should involve ensuring parents are clear by screening.  Most areas will have a recognised registration program for inherited eye diseases, which is strongly recommended for breeders to participate in.  In Australia, the Australian Veterinary Association runs the Australian Canine Eye Scheme (ACES), while breeders in the USA can certify their dogs via the Canine Eye Registration Foundation (CERF).

 

Cataract can also be associated with other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, and hypocalcaemia, and also due to some toxins, including internally produced toxins (e.g. those produced due to retinal degeneration) as well as external toxins. Cataract associated with diabetes mellitus often progresses very rapidly.

 

Cataract should not be confused with the normal aging change of the lens of the eye called sclerosis – this is often visible as a white cloudiness in older dogs’ eyes. Often this can be confused with cataract by dog owners, but sclerosis of the lens does NOT cause loss of vision.

Elbow Dysplasia

Screening Suggestions
1. Recognized radiographic screening technique under general anaesthesia at 12 - 24 months of age (usually done at same time as hip dysplasia screening) and assessed by accredited radiologist (may be required for breeding certification).
Overview

Elbow dysplasia refers to a group of developmental disorders affecting the elbow and leading to forelimb lameness in large breed dogs. It is inherited, and has a high heritability, with certain breeds showing increased prevalence of the disease.

 

One or more of the following abnormalities may be seen in either one or both elbows of affected animals:

Ununited anconeal process (UAP)

Fragmented medial coronoid process (FCP)

Osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle (osteochondritis dissecans, or OCD, occurs once a cartilage flap forms in the joint)

Incongruity due to asynchronous proximal growth of the radius and ulna

Incomplete ossification of the humeral condyle

 

Elbow dysplasia is one of the most common causes of forelimb lameness in large breed dogs.  Onset of joint pain is usually between 4 - 12 months, with lameness made worse following exercise.  Some dogs may not show pain and lameness until later in life, when degenerative joint changes and arthritis becomes apparent.  Diagnosis is confirmed with x-rays, and screening and scoring is performed for registries (e.g. the OFA Elbow Registry in the USA) for breeding animals in many countries.  

 

Treatment depends on the type of abnormality that is present. FCP is the most common form of elbow dysplasia in dogs, and for this form of the disease medical management is usually recommended, as surgical treatment has not been shown to improve the outcome for the patient. Other forms of elbow dysplasia regularly seen, OCD of the elbow and UAP, are recommended to be treated surgically to obtain the best outcome, and the prognosis is good if surgery is performed as early as possible, before any bony joint change (e.g. arthritis) occurs.

Epilepsy (Idiopathic, Primary or Inherited Seizures)